There are a variety of types of discrimination under the Equality Act 2010

  1. Direct discrimination – You’re treated less favourably than other workers because of your race/sex/age etc. If so, you’ve potentially been the victim of direct discrimination
  2. Indirect discrimination – A provision, criterion or practice is applied to you (such as that, for example, all workers must work at the weekend)  which places people of your race/sex/age (etc.) at a particular disadvantage and does in fact place you at a disadvantage (because, for example, you can’t work at weekends because of family commitments). If so, you’ve potentially been the victim of indirect discrimination
  3. Discrimination arising from disability – You’re disabled and have been treated less favourably than other employees who are not disabled, with no objective justification for the treatment. If so, you’ve potentially been the victim of discrimination arising from disability
  4. Pregnancy & maternity discrimination – You’re pregnant or on maternity leave and have been discriminated against by your employer (for example, you’ve been dismissed because you’ve said you’re planning to go on maternity leave). If so, you’ve potentially been the victim of pregnancy & maternity discrimination
  5. Failure to make reasonable adjustments – You’re disabled and a provision, criterion or practice, or  a physical feature, or the lack of an auxiliary aid (such as, for example, the failure to train other employees in sign language) puts you at a substantial disadvantage relating to your work in comparison with workers who are not disabled
  6. Harassment – You’re subjected to unwanted conduct at work which has the purpose or effect of violating your dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for you
  7. Sexual harassment – You’re subjected to unwanted conduct of a sexual nature at work which has the purpose or effect of violating your dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for you
  8. Victimisation – You’re subjected to a detriment because you’ve done a protected act or the person victimizing you believes that you have done, or may do, a protected act

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